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The Holiday Blues

By November 21, 2023Blog

By Don McNulty © COPYRIGHT 2023 ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

While the Holiday season is typically joyful, it can also bring the “Holiday Blues.”

Around 65% of people experience the Holiday Blues, as per a survey by the American Psychological Association. This phenomenon results from several triggers that are heightened during this season. Financial pressures, family issues, and personal health can all contribute to feelings of stress and sadness.

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Financial stress is a significant contributor to the Holiday Blues. According to a Gallup Poll, people planned to spend about $992 on gifts and holiday items in 2023. This is the same amount spent in 2022. However, with inflation over the past two years, the purchasing power will be less than in previous years. With the added inflation, this amount can represent a significant financial burden for many families and individuals.

Family dynamics can also add to the holiday stress. While some enjoy reuniting with family members, this forced interaction can lead to tension and conflict for others. The American Psychological Association states that 38% of people feel more stressed during holiday family gatherings.

Personal health is another factor that could contribute to feelings of stress and sadness during the holiday season. Unhealthy habits like eating junk food, not working out, having poor sleep, and drinking alcohol can cause physical discomfort and stress.
It’s important to remember that if you or someone you know is experiencing the Holiday Blues, you’re not alone, and help is available. To handle these emotions, mental health experts advise realistic expectations, taking care of oneself, volunteering, keeping a regular sleep and eating routine, and seeking support from others.

Remember, it’s completely normal to experience stress and sadness during the holiday season. However, if you feel these feelings are intense or lasting for long periods, seeking professional help is advisable. Mental health is just as important as physical health, and tending to it is crucial, especially during stressful times.

In North America, people seem to believe the myth that suicide increases during the holiday season. Suicide rates remain consistently low during the holiday season and the two months that follow.

However, if you are an individual having thoughts of self-harm or suicide, please call 988 right now. You will find compassionate help every day of the year.

Just to clarify, I am not suicidal. I have no one to talk to, no family, no friends. I’m mainly stuck at home. Is there someone I can call?

The answer to your question is YES; you can text HOME to 741741. Ten thousand volunteers are waiting to have a conversation and listen to your concerns or talk about whatever you want.

Facebook has several Groups dedicated to lonely people of every age or gender. We’ve researched just a few, but there are more. Find one that fits you. If you start with any suggestions I’ve shown below, and if they work for you, great! But if something feels wrong or doesn’t provide you the companionship you need, delete the group and find another. I know everyone has to start small, but we saw some groups with ten or twelve in the group, and it would be harder to have anonymity with a small group. If you’re sharing some of your private feelings and emotions, you’ll want to keep it anonymous.

Here is a small list of the Facebook Groups we suggest you begin with;

  • Lonely Ladies Support Group
  • Lonely Souls
  • Alone, Empty, Lonely Confused